“I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I need to be.” (Douglas Adams)

Close call.

On April 14, 1865, Abraham Lincoln invited General Grant and his wife, Julia, to accompany him and Mrs. Lincoln to Ford’s Theatre. The Grants declined. That night, of course, Lincoln was assassinated. Had the plan of John Wilkes Booth gone as intended, he would have killed not only the president, but a future president as well.

Why didn’t the Grants go? Because Julia Grant detested Mary Lincoln. A few weeks earlier while touring Grant’s headquarters together, Mary snubbed Julia so many times in front of so many important people that she refused to spend another night in her company. Grant biographer William S. McFeely writes, “Grant was left to make to the president the most classic — and limp — of excuses: He couldn’t go because of the children.”

“It is your moments of decision that your destiny is shaped.” (Anthony Robbins)

A couple went for their yearly checkups. The doctor saw the man first and asked him how he’d been feeling. “I have one problem, Doc,” he answered. “The first time my wife and I make love, everything is fine, but the second time I sweat a lot.”

The doctor completed the checkup and then examined the wife. “Your husband says the first time you make love is perfect, but that he perspires the second time. Do you know why?”

“Of course, I do!” she exclaimed. “The first time is in December and the second time is in August!”

“When you think you can’t, revisit a previous triumph.” (Jack Canfield)

My Uncle John’s Bathroom Reader has several clever anagrams (words or phrases whose letters can be rearranged to form new words or phrases). Here are a few:

NEGATION becomes GET A NO IN.

BURY THE HATCHET becomes BUTCHER THY HATE.

SUPREME COURT becomes CORRUPT? SUE ME.

THE ASSASSINATION OF PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN becomes A PISTOL IN AN ACTOR’S REBEL HANDS; A FINE MANY IS SHOT.

PUBLIC RELATIONS becomes CRAP, BUILT ON LIES.

SENATOR becomes TREASON.

A PSYCHIATRIST becomes SIT, CHAT, PAY, SIR.

“Quiet people have the loudest minds.” (Stephen King)

While visiting with Ann’s sister, Mary Miller, this past summer, Mary received a phone call from the American Academy of Actuaries notifying her of the fact that she was to receive the 2019 Jarvis Farley Award. This award honors actuaries whose volunteer efforts on behalf of the Academy have made significant contributions to the advancement of the profession. Miller was awarded the Jarvis Farley award this past Tuesday at the Academy’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C. during the first day luncheon.

Mary spent much of her life as an actuary and she previously received the Robert J. Myers Award for public service back in 2011. For that honor, she was selected in recognition of her extraordinary contributions to the public good through her 16 years of service as a property and casualty actuary with the Ohio Department of Insurance.

She also has served the public interest through various volunteer positions at the American Academy of Actuaries, where she served on its board of directors as a regular director and even served as president in 2014.

“Failure is a bruise, not a tattoo.” (Jon Sinclair)

”You can’t start something new without stopping something else.” (Michael Stelzner)

Email comments to geno34@embarqmail.com.

Email comments to briank@northwestsignal.net

I started at the Northwest Signal in 1994 and became editor in 2004. I graduated from Bowling Green State University in 1994.

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